Ken Price

Ken Price, Half Mast, 1999

Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective traces the development of Price’s sculptural practice from his luminously glazed ovoid forms to his suggestive, molten-like slumps, positioning him within the larger narrative of modern American sculpture. This sculptural retrospective honors the late artist’s creativity, originality, and revolutionary art practice.”

http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/2012/12/ken-price-at-lacma/

 

Advertisements

ARTICLE: A Critical Analysis of Patricia Piccinini’s Art: Re-presenting Biotechnology

It is also this immense potential – to alter life as we know it – that attracts the attention of Australian artist Patricia Piccinini, inspiring her to create a series of anthropomorphic sculptures. Through art, Piccinini contributes to the global debate on this controversial technology.

The blobs, while clearly engineered by Man, have their own lives. Folds of blemished skin suggest growth and age. Orifices represent means to intake sustenance and excrete waste matter. A thin layer of hair provides a mechanism to regulate basal temperature while a vertebrate suggests structural support for vital organs and a nervous system. Faithful rendering of surface textures contribute to the vitality of these lumps; the ‘stem cells’ are unnervingly life–like.

Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread
Untitled (Double Amber Bed)

1991.

Rubber and high density foam. 47 x 54 x 41 in. (119.4 x 137.2 x 104.1 cm). Collection of Gail and Tondy Ganz, Los Angeles. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.
Vitrine Objects. Dimensions and Media variable. Private Collection. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Mike Bruce.
Circle

Article references for abstract

Unless there are big changes within the next 20 years, I foresee a two-class food system. One class will eat industrialized food produced as cheaply as possible at the expense of its workers and natural resources. The other will enjoy home gardens and locally and sustainably produced food, at greater cost. I’m hoping for the enormous expansion of this latter approach. For that, we need a farm policy inextricably linked to health and environmental policy. We can achieve that, but only with serious advocacy and political engagement.

Marion Nestle is professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University.

Looking forward, there might be some higher tech food but I don’t see a lot of soylent in our future. The highly processed junk that dominates our diet takes advantage of the way we grow and process crops and turns them into food-like substances that to many people taste good, provide enough calories, and are cheap and familiar enough to tolerate, but they barely sustain basic nutrition. There might be some fancy footwork but a 3D printed cheeseburger will still be a cheeseburger.

Mark Bittman is a writer for the New York Times and the author of How to Cook Everything.

http://time.com/3482452/future-of-food/

Rat meat dressed up as lambhttp://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/may/03/china-meat-offence-rat-mutton adulterated milk and baby formula, substandard school textbooks – the Chinese have plenty to be concerned about right now apart from the perennial problems of pollution and growing concern about falling economic growth. The country’s new leader, Xi Jinping, has been talking of pursuing a “China dream”, but cruder everyday realities keep intruding, posing what may be the central challenge for his administration.

The past fortnight alone has brought news of the arrest of a gang that added gelatine to flesh from rats, foxes and minks, and sold it as lamb without any testing for quality or safety. In Shandong province, farmers were found to have used a highly toxic pesticide on ginger plants, while in central China, 3m school dictionaries were discovered to be rip-offs full of errors.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/may/12/china-food-scandals-undermine-trust

Paper profit for Chinese stalls’ cardboard buns

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/jul/13/china.international

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/150422-genetically-modified-food-agriculture-health-ngbooktalk/

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/g/genetically_modified_food/index.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/06/opinion/lets-make-food-issues-real.html?ref=topics&_r=0

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/21/business/gene-altered-apples-and-potatoes-are-safe-fda-says.html?ref=topics

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stefanski/gmos-are-on-your-sidewhy-_b_7270896.html

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/g/genetically_modified_food/index.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/genetically-modified-food/

http://www.art-xy.com/2011/05/re-presenting-biotechnology.html

Abstract draft 2

Emma Statement 0603

“The highly processed junk that dominates our diet takes advantage of the way we grow

and process crops and turns them into food-like substances that to many people taste

good, provide enough calories, and are cheap and familiar enough to tolerate, but they

barely sustain basic nutrition.” (The Future of Food: Experts Predict How Our Plates Will

Change)

What are we putting onto our plates? There is now an immense potential to alter

genetics and fabricate nature in a way that is most profitable to us. Buns made of

chopped cardboard, rat meat dressed up as lamb – endless food scandals are

increasing the world’s anxiety about food safety. To make the most profit out of the

least amount of resources, bioengineering is used to create genetically “better”

produce using hormones to blow up the volume, producing industrialized food

produced as low-cost as possible. Food it is now a product of mass

consumption, some imagine a future where we no longer grow organic produce

through a natural process, such as 3D printing. While on the other hand, a group of

experts are calling on that all these lab synthesized foods might not just be bad news

– genetically modified food is said to be safe, might allow us to feed the starving.

(GMO is on your side, why aren’t you on its side? – Guardian)

Reflecting the increasingly ambiguous line between natural and manmade, I

imagined the future versions of vegetation today. Conceptually inspired by Patricia

Piccinini, and employing methods of process designers: Studio Swine, Mischer

Traxier, Studio Pasternak, these forms look like fused together elements of

vegetables we commonly find on our dinner table, but mutated into a living creature.

The repetition however forms a sort of three-dimensional pattern, somewhat pleasing

to the eye, defamiliarizing the organic vegetables as merely surface patterns.  I was

interested in the contrast of making identical duplicates of organic foods, which we

once believe cannot fabricate using technology – organisms that are meant to be

individually unique. The process reproducing through casting is associated with mass

production, wax is the material used to make lifelike imitations of humans, also a

malleable material able to be made to any artificial shape.

By presenting these forms I am not criticizing nor promoting the idea, but perhaps I

am projecting my anxiety of what scientists cook up in laboratories, which may end

up on my plate.

Yushi Cheng

Is Genetically Engineered Food A Fraud? – by Simon Worrall, National Geographic

Food scandals are undermining trust in China’s new regime – by Jonathan Fenby, Guardian

The Future of Food: Experts Predict How Our Plates Will Change – by Sarah Begley, Time

Screen Shot 2015-06-04 at 7.50.40 PM

Abstract Draft 1

What are we putting onto our plates? Today we seem to have control over everything. There is now an immense potential to alter genetics and fabricate nature in a way that is most profitable to us. It used to be that we ate from nature as it is, but now merely nature no longer satisfies us. Food being the most basic living need, it is also a product of mass consumption. To make the most profit out of the least amount of resources, bioengineering is used to create genetically “better” produce, using hormones to blow up the volume,[ others don’t even bother to go through all this hassle, and just use other materials to fake the real thing – even if it means using non edible material.]< this is a clumsy sentence. You need more references, not generalisations. Have you read articles on exactly what it is that is done to food? While on the other hand,[ some say]< another generalisation that all these lab synthesized foods might not just be bad news. genetically modified food might allow us to feed the starving.

Reflecting the increasingly ambiguous line between natural and manmade, I imagined the future versions of vegetation today. These organisms look like fused together elements of vegetables we commonly find on our dinner table, but mutated into a living creature. Perhaps through these monstrous vegetables I am projecting my fear of what scientists cook up in laboratories, which may end up on my plate.

A good start. Talk more about the processes you are employing in order to illustrate or suggest these listed notions in your objects. Also list the types of food you are responding to, ie. Artificial/organic/food courts/international/bi-cultural. Etc.

=============

Help from Freya: MLA works cited

Screen Shot 2015-06-04 at 7.50.40 PM